Pan Pressure - Racepak Sensor Readings

Discussion in 'Manton Push Rods Top Alcohol Tech Questions' started by blwnaway, Apr 5, 2017.

  1. blwnaway

    blwnaway Member

    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2006
    Messages:
    411
    Likes Received:
    0
    Does anyone (or possibly everyone) use a RP sensor to monitor pan pressure during a run? I am not sure what to look ofr as far as healthy numbers at higher RPM's. I have not ran one long enough to have any previous data thus my reason to ask here.

    If you do then where do you get your reading from? I tapped the right side valve cover and used a quick connect push lock fitting to run a 1/4" plastic line inside to the sensor.
     
    #1
  2. TOL

    TOL Active Member

    Joined:
    May 18, 2005
    Messages:
    1,096
    Likes Received:
    5
    Blown alcohol? What numbers are you seeing right now? Dry or wet sump?
     
    #2
  3. TAF 316

    TAF 316 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2004
    Messages:
    277
    Likes Received:
    0
    tap the manifold to pick up pressure in the valley
     
    #3
  4. blwnaway

    blwnaway Member

    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2006
    Messages:
    411
    Likes Received:
    0
    Screw Blown Hemi.

    Why would pressure in the valley be any different than pressure in the valve cover?
     
    #4
  5. Mike Kern

    Mike Kern New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2010
    Messages:
    26
    Likes Received:
    0
    Pressure is equal in all directions in the crankcase. As for healthy numbers on a TA car, not exactly sure. What you want to look for is a significant change or rise during the run (or run to run) that would signify a problem. If it makes 10 good runs in a row and the pan PSI is the same, that's probably your healthy number. On a safety note, I made my sensor line out of SS braid brake/fuel pressure line and it is hard plumbed. Should you ever have a mishap and the line blows out, it then becomes a high pressure oil sprayer. If you hard plumb it to the engine block somewhere (front cover/valley) then you only need to remove it when changing engines
     
    #5
  6. Will Hanna

    Will Hanna We put the 'inside' in Top Alcohol
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 6, 2003
    Messages:
    6,365
    Likes Received:
    61
    Typically what you will see is it be pretty low early in the run and start making pan pressure probably 900-1000'. With a 'conventional' ring package of moly rings we usually see 3.5 lbs at the end of a run. If I start seeing more I know it's time for rings or hone or both. Or it could indicate a problem.

    Most use a push fit line since it is very low pressure. If you got so much pan pressure you blow that line out, chances are you got way worse problems than a little bit of oil blowing out whatever little fitting you put there. You probably won't say "man if that 1/4" line hadn't blown out, we wouldn't have this mess...."

    As far as placement, bottom of intake to take pressure from the lifter valley is the 'conventional' location. Depending on where you place it on the valve cover, it may be in a spot that is submerged in oil. There is probably a lot more oil than we think up there at the end of a run. As Norm Drazy said "they are called oil returns because they return oil on the return road."
     
    #6
  7. Mike Kern

    Mike Kern New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2010
    Messages:
    26
    Likes Received:
    0
    Very true Will, my recommendation for hard line (braided hose) comes from big show TF/FC where it can be a big problem more often. I've seen more than one car in a wall due to a burnt piston or pushed head gasket blowing oil directly on a tire (or fuel from a cracked fitting for that matter). You can never be overly cautious when it comes to mitigating potential leaks. What's your car (or your life) worth to you?
     
    #7

Share This Page