track surface temp

Discussion in 'Manton Push Rods Top Alcohol Tech Questions' started by slowpoke96z28, Apr 29, 2017.

  1. slowpoke96z28

    slowpoke96z28 Member

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    how do I use that information in making tuning decisions?
     
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  2. slowpoke96z28

    slowpoke96z28 Member

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    Anybody??
     
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  3. youngtuner

    youngtuner Member

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    Email address?
     
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  4. slowpoke96z28

    slowpoke96z28 Member

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  5. slowpoke96z28

    slowpoke96z28 Member

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  6. mogenss

    mogenss Member

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  7. lucky devil

    lucky devil Member

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  8. 32 bantam

    32 bantam Member

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  9. Will Hanna

    Will Hanna We put the 'inside' in Top Alcohol
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    A very broad question that is application specific.

    In very general terms I would call optimum 85-95 degrees. 96-105, 75-85 would be very good, and you can connect the dots from there. A cool track can be very, very good and tight, depending on the prep. It can also be loose.

    The variable in any of the above readings would be the amount of rubber, age of rubber and condition of rubber. That is why NHRA style prep with a tire rotator (and completely scraping track prior to event) is optimum for a slick tire.

    Cold tracks tend to become 'slick' as they get bad, and hot tracks become greasy. Yes there's a difference.
     
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  10. slowpoke96z28

    slowpoke96z28 Member

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    85-95 is optimum
    75-85 is very good
    96-105 is also very good?

    Am I using this info for timing off the line? Tire pressure? Timing over the whole run? Clutch weights?
     
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  11. Will Hanna

    Will Hanna We put the 'inside' in Top Alcohol
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    To answer the first question, yes, 85-95 is optimum, 75-85 would be very good as would be 96-105.

    Second quesiton: Oh boy, that's a loaded question. Yes, Yes, Kinda, Maybe.

    Yes definitely adjust timing off the line for conditions. Yes definitely is the determining factor in tire pressure adjustments. You may adjust clutch weight depending on what you are doing with timing curve.

    Please don't take this the wrong way, but I think hiring a tuning consultant or getting a veteran racer to mentor you would really help you learn these things. Or volunteer to go crew with a veteran for a year or at least a few races. Learn the easy way instead of the hard way.

    I started off polishing wheels, cleaning the trailer and washing parts. But I learned the game.
     
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  12. slowpoke96z28

    slowpoke96z28 Member

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    I got that tight means a lot of grip. that makes sense even with no explanation. but loose and greasy being 2 different things? imma need that explained to me.
     
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  13. Mike Canter

    Mike Canter Top Dragster

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    Will is correct, it is cheaper to rent Will and have him walk you through it. Hopefully you have a MSD Grid which makes it easier to adjust for track conditions. Also I think life is easier with a converter than a clutch
     
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  14. Will Hanna

    Will Hanna We put the 'inside' in Top Alcohol
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    When the rubber is cold, the track is hard, so it's "slick" kind of like ice.

    When the rubber is hot, the track gets "greasy." The rubber becomes pliable.

    What kind of car are you racing?
     
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  15. slowpoke96z28

    slowpoke96z28 Member

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    Idk what class it would be in. It's a 68 camaro 25.2 chassis ladder bar car. 31x13.5 tire. It will be getting a grid as soon as can get one. I'm always a day late...
     
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  16. slowpoke96z28

    slowpoke96z28 Member

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    Got the grid. I think i'm asking the wrong question. I understand the temp plays a big part in how much traction the surface can offer, and that I can retard timing to make sure I don't overpower that available traction. What i'm missing is how do I take that understanding of the theory (unless I'm not understanding the theory correctly), apply the measured track temp and make a decision. Or is it a matter of just guessing and recording, then seeing what worked and deferring to that the next time I see that same track temp?

    If anyone knows of teams in the Dallas area needing/wanting help or someone to train, i'm all ears. I've posted in the help sections here and on insidepromod, but haven't had any takers yet.
     
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  17. Will Hanna

    Will Hanna We put the 'inside' in Top Alcohol
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    learning what to do and how much is definitely a trial and error deal based on your combo
     
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