Proper Peelie Procedure

Discussion in 'Manton Push Rods Top Alcohol Tech Questions' started by Bob Alberty Jr., Apr 19, 2017.

  1. Bob Alberty Jr.

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    Still have a week and a half untill I get to play with my toy again. Co-workers are stick and ball guys. I'd rather talk race cars, so here I am.
    I've always done the roll through the water, high gear, give the pedal a tickle, and hey we're vulcanizing type.
    Alot of people do the stop, and go method.
    Figure its a matter of personal preference, but the the roll method looks to me like less shock on the driveline.
    Discuss...
     
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  2. Will Hanna

    Will Hanna We put the 'inside' in Top Alcohol
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    Back when I drove the Clack TAFC with a Lencodrive, the car owner and I both preferred to roll through the box, stop, get on the tbrake and go up a little on the rpm and drop the button. The thought process was to minimize converter slippage during the burnout and let the slippage be done with the tires. This would lead to less heat in the converter. Now granted this was before two steps were legal so we had a two stage pedal instead of a 2 step, so I didn't have to worry about hitting the chip in that process. Theoretically could still be done with a second switch for transbrake, or wiring a 3 way switch to burnout mode switch for the grid, but I don't think it's that much advantageous over a roll and punch burnout.

    The key to a roll and punch burnout is to get enough wheel speed you aren't lugging on the motor and creating extra driveline heat. In my opinion that's far harder than the shock of hitting it with a transbrake and going into instant spin since there is water on the tires.

    Unless you are very consistent with the throttle, I recommend a throttle stop for bracket racing because you want the exact same burnout every time. The down side is if your crewmember forgets to take it off, you're toast.

    For personal enjoyment purposes, a non throttle stop burnout provides the most fun once you get the hang of it.

    To further elaborate on the subject, the whole point of a "Stop and punch" burnout like Manzo and other clutch cars do is to minimize clutch wear by shocking the tire rather than risk slipping the clutch during throttle application. It's also easier to teach a new driver (with clutch) to do a burnout like this, because what I tell them is to stop past the water, bring the motor up to 4500 and drop the clutch but leave your throttle foot alone.
     
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  3. CjRedden

    CjRedden Member

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    Will,
    Can you elaborate a little more on what your number one preference is with a 3 spd lencodrive? If you use a transbrake, what gear do you suggest you start in? Will it hold in 2md gear to get the rpms up then pull high gear once the tires are spinning? Will a rolling start in 2nd gear be better for thr convetter before pulling 3rd gear? Top sportsman car
     
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  4. Will Hanna

    Will Hanna We put the 'inside' in Top Alcohol
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    We do roll and punch in high gear with the Kruse Missile TD. We use a throttle stop because Dee has raced for so many years with carb/gas motors where he just used a 3 step for the burnout, he was struggling to do the same burnout every time, so we just put a cable clip throttle stop on it, problem solved. It took some time to get it adjusted right, but once we did, it works well every time. Our trans temp is usually within 10 degrees at stage run to run.

    Any blown motor should have no problem getting the tires smoking with a high gear wet tire burnout.
     
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  5. JustinatAce

    JustinatAce Member

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    From a tuning standpoint, just do the same thing every time. Some people have a hard time with the rolling burnout because they roll too far past the water before lighting them up, or roll too far and wind up back in their own water tracks for launch. Different tracks typically aren't the same distance between water box and stage beam. The other problem is not enough right foot to snap the tire into the spin or keep it spinning. Stopped burnouts usually give a more consistent launch surface every lap.

    Granted, this opinion is also coming from a guy who helps tune a sometimes stopped by the 1/8th mile burnout clutched TAFC, but he does it every lap. And to his credit, it looks like fun.
     
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  6. WIDEOPEN231

    WIDEOPEN231 Member

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    1/8 mile burnout is huge fun meter number,low fun for guy paying for it. I was both and learned fun is not worth cost. Have always done roll and punch. Hardest part lifting,just to much fun. Again cost changes things.
     
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  7. Fuel Cars

    Fuel Cars AA/AM

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    I used to to stop then punch it but the car would start going sideways almost immediately. A friend suggested to roll thru then punch to keep it straighter, and it worked!
     
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  8. GregM784

    GregM784 Member

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    A little ground speed helps keep the car from washing out. Stopping and going allows me to do shorter burnouts while still having the tire heat we look for. Saves time backing up too. That is what burns a lot of fuel is the backing up (on our combo)
     
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