Observations on improving the promotion of alcohol racing

Discussion in 'System One Pit Buzz' started by Will Hanna, Feb 21, 2005.

  1. Will Hanna

    Will Hanna We put the 'inside' in Top Alcohol
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    After watching the Pomona alcohol show, which was good as usual, I finally figured it was time to sit down and see if we can get the ball rolling to improve the promotion of the alcohol categories.

    Now before I go any further, I'd like to keep this thread free of talking about how bad it is, pointing fingers or this and that. Let’s keep it objective and constructive and see if we can come up with some realistic solutions that the powers that be at NHRA and Lucas can implement in the reasonably near future.

    First off I'd like to point out a few of the strides that have been made in the past few years. TV package is the first thing that comes to mind. I remember winning Indy in 2000 with Jay Meyer and it wasn't even on TV. Now every event we go to has TV coverage. Granted, we have fewer events than we did, but that's huge in the sponsor game, and ultimately the promotion of the classes. Secondly, the current staff behind the mike has done a great job trying to go the extra mile to pump up the alcohol classes. All of the announcers have been very receptive in promoting sponsors, and all of them used the team profiles TARA put together last year. There have been some other things, but those were the two most notable.

    So to start out, I'm just going to specify my 'wish list' if you will of the 3 top things to improve.

    1. Fan interest/appeal
    2. Divisional events
    3. More sponsorships

    So let’s tackle the big one, fan interest and appeal. I think the model used by the pro's in the Powerade series and ultimately our round track friends in the Nextel series are good ones to look at. In both of those series, the personalities of the drivers and teams are promoted much more than what we see in TAD/TAFC. Of course, on the flip side, they are 'pro' but we also are 'pro sportsman'. I remember Brad Anderson saying a long time ago when Randy was still running TAFC, that the fans got to know who Frank Manzo, Jay Payne, Duane Shields, David Wells, etc... are if they want to come see them. The only promotion of personalities right now is if you win a round, you might get a top end interview, and whatever the announcer happens to say about you when you are running on TV and over the PA. In an effort to keep the sponsors happy, much of that time is used thanking them and plugging them by both the drivers in their interviews and to a degree by the announcers. While that is certainly necessary, it really cuts the amount of personality that is conveyed to the fan. Bottom line, the more info that is presented to a potential fan, the more reason's that fan has to like you, root for you and watch you race. Maybe it's the hometown or state you're from. Maybe it’s the fact you're in the wrecker business and so are they. Maybe they like your personality. Maybe you just look good. Right now, without knowing you before hand, all a fan is going to know about most alcohol racers is that they use <insert oil here>, <Brand> Spark Plugs and their crew did a great job keeping the car running.

    To help promote the personalities of the class, if profile spots could be filmed on the teams, this would be huge. The material could be used on both the TV show and on the Motel 6 vision during the burnouts. To make this realistic, NHRA/ESPN could select say 4-5 drivers to do spots on at each race. Within the span of a season, you could have a good base to use.

    Now that fan knows a little more about Dennis Taylor and now when you promote a divisional event (if it's even done, we'll cover this later) and do a spot that says Dennis Taylor among others will be there, it means something. If Dennis Taylor, which now you know some people just call him DT for short, is in the next round, you're damn sure going to go watch him. Then once you go down and meet him and find out just how 'cool' he is, you might just make a trip to the next divisional, or buy a sponsors product. Since he's a working class guy, you relate to him more. And you know what, that's what makes NHRA Drag Racing what it is. Fans. Doing this would improve the fan base, improve loyalty, and ultimately make the sport as a whole better.

    It also helps the TV show. It would give Marty Reid, Bob Frey and Dave Rieff more material. It gives the entire show more character. It also gives teams a better product to sell sponsors.

    Another thing that could be done at the track is to add top end interviews over the PA much like the pro's get. I also remember a few years ago they did starting line interviews with the winning crew chiefs in the finals, and that was a cool thing. They should bring that back as well.

    I had these things in mind tonight when I watched the show. To give the production crew credit, they cram a lot into the 1 hr time slot. I have to believe tonight’s show was a little shorter than most due to the fact '3' was aired before it came on, and came into the time slot. I think the profile spots could easily be added.

    In addition to the personalities, the machines themselves should be showcased more to our gear head audience. Get down the in the pits and show the fans the difference in an A/Fueler and a blown car other than they sound different. Show them what exactly is going on with this whole 'automatic' Lencodrive deal. What does an alcohol team do between rounds? Do a profile on a team to show that the bottom end guy works at a machine shop during the week, and the parts washer is a kid in high school. If the blower is hanging off the side when you do the top end interview, send a crew down to show the thrash, and the fact 3 other teams are helping that team get ready for the final.

    Those are some of the most realistic recommendations that would be somewhat simple to implement. Here's my wish list:

    Live coverage. There was a time when NHRA first debuted live coverage when they would show the finals of TAD/TAFC. My reason is not so much because it’s live or tape delayed, but to get the classes closer to the mainstream. Even if it’s a quick segment of the pro show, it would be huge to swing that.

    More cross promotion of the Lucas Oil television shows. I know they don't even do it with the pro show, but if they had some more marketing dollars laying around (side note, I really do appreciate everything the folks at Lucas Oil do for the class, so don't take this wrong) to run a spot that the 'Future stars of the sport are coming on tonight.' The more people that see that commercial, that’s advertising for Lucas, then if more people tune in, they can hear Lucas Oil.... mentioned 457 times during that 30 minutes. More viewers, better sponsor reports, more sponsors in the class, more people buy Lucas Oil, everyone wins.

    More coverage on NHRA.com. Not only running more team news, but maybe getting some features like they do on the pro’s.

    Ok, on to item No. 2 and that’s the current divisional system. Let’s face it, it’s a broke system with a great sponsor, at least for the alcohol cars. At least in a business sense. I still enjoy running on the divisional level myself, but nobody is winning on the business side of things at these races. The racers aren’t winning, making up to seven runs for a max payout of $3,500 if you win and qualify No. 1. Most tracks don’t promote the races, so a race team doesn’t have much to offer a sponsor at a divisional unless it’s a hardcore sportsman race product. The track isn’t winning because they are shooting for a back gate profit, and the alcohol car’s purse eats into that profit. Granted there are a few tracks that still promote the alcohol cars, and pull a crowd. However, they become fewer every year.

    The prevailing trend in divisional events is the goal of making a back gate profit. That is making money off of sportsman racer’s entry fees. Hence last year’s alcohol entry fee. Many of them have taken this low risk route opposed to taking the risk of advertising the alcohol show. The scheduling of some of these events also makes promoting the alcohol cars a null point. Two events come to mind, Gainesville and Houston. Why would a fan want to come see the alcohol show this month and pay $40 a head for the weekend when one month later the nationals come to town, and they see more alcohol cars and the pros. Not to mention the average fan probably doesn’t have the discretionary income to take the family to the nationals AND the divisional in one month.

    So what’s the answer? There are a couple different angles to take. Do you fix the wrecked car or do you call it totaled and buy a new one? First let’s take a look at what can be done to fix the current system.

    The reason why there aren’t fans in the stands at some of these events is not only lack of promotion, but the current promotion system isn’t getting the job done. NHRA Field Marketing puts a lot of effort into helping tracks promote their events. In some instances that help isn’t used, and I think different angles and approaches could put more fans in the stands by the tracks that do use them. Once again, I think it falls back to promoting the personalities more. An event preview press release is sent out to local media before every event that does a very brief rundown of what’s running, and to their credit, it does mention who’s leading in alcohol points coming in, and maybe a few mentions for a local alcohol racer, then on to other sportsman mentions. This is a great ‘who-what-when-where’ release, but I think it fails to set the hook hard enough. Put something together like “Force and Howard set to battle it out to see who’s the ‘Woman’ in Div. 4” “2003 Champ Cannon to square off with defending Champ Kelly” “O’Bannon and Grimes are back; Demke not worried.” Not only is this promoting a little more, it gives some personalities for the fans to root for, a story like this is much more likely to grab a sports editor’s attention and run the spot than the who what when where piece.

    On the promotional side, NHRA can’t put a gun to the track owner’s head and make them spend money to promote the divisional events. Granted, they could probably exert more pressure, but that’s not at issue here. If a track is determined to make it a back gate event, why not open the front gate. It only makes business sense. Over the past few years the Texas Motorplex, a national event track has packed the house Saturday and Sunday for divisional events. The pit side grandstand would be nearly ¾ full. How are they doing this? They team up with a local radio station and give away nearly 10,000 tickets. Where’s the revenue? Well when those free fans show up, they usually buy a $5 hamburger and a $4 large coke (oh you want cheese, that’s $5 extra). These fans aren’t there when you just make it a back gate event. Most of those racers are bringing their own food as well. You also gain potential new fans that now may come to the nationals and other track events. It’s pretty hard to lose out on this deal. All of a sudden, the alcohol cars are the stars of the show to several thousand fans. That’s something you can sell to a sponsor.

    To get there, NHRA needs to make the tracks either promote the show or adopt a similar plan to the Motorplex’s to keep alcohol cars running there.

    If the above is not an option, then the system is ‘totaled.’ So now you can the current system and go to regional events for alcohol cars. Put TAD/TAFC/Pro Mod in on a Friday and Saturday night show at the tracks that want them. 16 car fields. National event points and purse. Make it clearly a front gate event. Run qualifying Friday night and eliminations Saturday night. Two events per division. This would give alcohol racers 24 national events to once again go to.

    What do you do with the divisionals then? Either make the divisional points completely separate from nationals, or run the alcohol cars only at nationals/regionals. Make the national championship from your best 10 out of 14 events.

    Yes, I know the latter is a drastic change. But, there’s no way around the fact the way it is now is broke. Instead of running a broke system, let’s try to fix it or replace it.

    Finally item number three, more sponsorships. I think the points made in items one and two would open the door for more sponsorships for alcohol teams, both directly and indirectly.

    Motorsports marketing has definitely become a business these days. You’ve really got to work hard to find it, especially if you’re going for a non-automotive sponsor. Other than the oil companies that have experienced motorsports reps that go out and find the guy they want to put their name on, the days of just being good and getting a sponsor are nearly dead. You have to go out and put together a package that makes good business sense to the prospective company, and hope you get a lot of luck in the process. The people you are selling to don’t think like a racer, so you have to really try hard to step out of that mindset.

    At any rate, procuring sponsorships is a discussion in itself. What we’re looking for here is how to help teams get more sponsors.

    The easiest thing is to lift some of the restrictions put on us ‘sportsman’ racers. One, let us sell merchandise, two, let teams buy hospitality spots if necessary.

    At the present, the only way a top alcohol team can sell merchandise at the track is to be affiliated with a pro team. I recently had a MAJOR professional sports team interested in doing a deal with an alcohol team. The deal essentially was funded on the backside with the team giving the branding rights with the team making money on trackside merchandise sales. The deal never got off the ground because a pro team had to be sponsored as well to get a merchandise booth. Reasons in the past for not allowing an alcohol shirt trailer are that it would be a money losing deal. First off, alcohol racers already have a high threshold for losing money, because, well, alcohol racing is a money losing deal. Secondly, if this ‘loss-leader’ activity would open the door for more sponsor money, the benefit would certainly outweigh the loss. Thirdly, I’m sure this would be a collaborative effort, and expenses could be spread out to a very bearable level.

    An alcohol team also has a hard time getting space for potential sponsor hospitality area. Granted some tracks just don’t allow the pit area for this, some do. If it is available, alcohol teams should certainly be able to buy pit space to for corporate hospitality.

    In closing, I would like to reiterate this is not intended to be a scathing editorial on what’s wrong with the state of alcohol, rather let’s put some ideas on the table, and try to move forward and make alcohol racing better as a whole. I encourage ideas to be posted here, and this thread will be forwarded to the powers that be at NHRA and Lucas. Let’s keep it clean and objective, and maybe something good will happen out of it.

    See ya at the track,
    Will Hanna
     
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  2. nitrohawk

    nitrohawk New Member

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    Good post Will. I agree with a lot of what you have to say and the fact is this class needs some changes. I am not being negative here but it just seems as though the powers to be don't want the class to progress to the status we do. It is really discourgeing to me that the sports nationals doesn't feature the third quickest and fastest sportsman class. Last year we were told that it was just a trial race and TAD/TAFC would be added this year. Not only did we not get added at No Problem Raceway but now there are two Sports Nationals and we are not included in either race. This would have been a race for national points and should have featured the class. Its like we're to fast to be considered sportsman racers and to close to the pro times so would be a distraction to the promotion. I do think that the addition of Ashley Force and some of the new racers to the class might help get us more recognition. Hope you get your TAFC and Lenco deal worked out. I personally think the TAFC is a easier class to promote and obtain sponcers. Some racers have changed because of the rules changes and the class should do nothing but improve in 05. Keep up the good work and I encourge you to keep on plugging away.
     
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  3. Will Hanna

    Will Hanna We put the 'inside' in Top Alcohol
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    While the SportsNationals are billed as 'nationals' they are more of a super divisional with the aim of a high car count to fund the back gate.

    Enter AMS Pro Mod with their free show. Even if the track is paying some of the purse, it's probably not as much as the national event payout for TAD/TAFC. No Problem has a good fan base that has came out without bringing in a high priced show. They spend some money on a few fuel cars and pro stockers, but in the end, it's still probably less than the payout for TAD/TAFC.

    I don't know how Columbus will do with their front gate, but the back gate must be pretty lucrative on these events if NHRA is getting in on this with one of their own tracks.

    In other words, these are closer to 'super divisionals' in the fact they are backgate driven.

    I would definitely like to see the alcohol cars included in these events at some level, or seperate front gate events done with tracks that want to push them.
     
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  4. ITS IN MY BLOOD

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    wow... ijust bought a alky funny car, and now i am wondering if i made a bad dicision ?????
    qoute:
    "racers already have a high threshold for losing money, because, well, alcohol racing is a money losing deal".

    i dont just want to piss away ten`s of thousands of dollar`s away just like that.

    so why is the alky class a money losing deal ???

    how can the alky class become atleast marginaly profitable, i mean arent we mainly out here to have fun?? because we love the sport???. but things need to get taken care of, its all about money.
    who can the alky class racers get, to step up to the plate and make the pay outs more realistic, based on the cost`s that it takes to run one of these cars it needs to be more..right ???.
    i havent even driven one yet, but i have one, and i have always wanted to for as long as ive been around drag racing 25 yrs.
    am i, in a no win, lose lose situation.
    i sincerly hope that the future of alky funny car racing improves to the level it deserves.
     
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  5. Will Hanna

    Will Hanna We put the 'inside' in Top Alcohol
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    That statement was to a degree a play on words, but unless you have sponsorship, your bottom line will be in the red. At least running at a competitive level.

    In the perfect world, if you were running a tight ship, keeping the car happy with what it needed and not much fat elsewhere within the team, I think it is conceivable to come close to breaking even if you win an event with contingency and winnings, IF you didn't blow anything up. At any other level of payout, the runs to winnings ratio is in the red.

    I wouldn't hold your breath on increased payouts.
     
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  6. nitrohawk

    nitrohawk New Member

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    I think that most TAD/TAFC racers do it for the love of the sport but would certainly like to think that at some point on the success latter you could ease up an the check writing. In fact if the truth were known most would prob. rather own or drive a TFD or TFFC. Since that is such a monumental task for most this is the next best thing with speeds and et's attainable that is where the pro class was just a few years back. My hat is off to all who try at whatever level. It takes a tremendous amount of skill to field a competetive car in either fuel or alcohol type cars. It also takes lots of organazational skills
    and planning to have a successful program. I raced a TFD as a semi-pro racer for many years and had a competetive car but that was then and this is now. It takes much more skill and money to run a TAD/TAFC than it did a TFD not to many years ago. I have no idea where the class will be in five years but agree with Will that something has to change. Will I think you and most others evedently don't see what a huge void is created by NHRA ommitting the class from the "advertised"
    Sports Nationals. This is not a new concept. Didn't they run this race in the past and didn't the alcohol class participate. These shows would feature the class if done right and the class would be the penicle of sportsman racing. I bet the money they paid Amato, Jeg, Jet cars, etc. was greater than the purse they would have to put up for TAD/TAFC. Not to mention what they had to kick in for the pro mods. Who do you think would get the most tv coverage at one of these races if they did have the class. The fact that they felt they had to go out and pay these other cars in to have something with speed to advertise is a real putdown to this class who even though we are considered sportsman are the third fastest and quickest class. I have prob. said to much already and feel as though we should accept the role of stepchildren and just keep quiet and go race.
     
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  7. Darren Smith

    Darren Smith New Member

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    I think that the Alky cars get more fans in the stands when they run just prior to Pro sessions. At some races they run them after the Fuel cars when people are headed for the exits. But the alky cars had better get the oildown situation under control before anything.
     
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  8. sc7662

    sc7662 Member

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    I love this sport and the people involved,I also am part of a great team (rapid transit)Marty and our guys last year had a great outcome with Chris from Joliet at the Nascar race,where we displayed the dragster and handed out some free tickets to the divisional race for the next weekend.I was personally amazed at the ignorance or lack of knowledge to our sport.We stood bye the car passing out tickets and letting kids sit in the car getting photographs.Chris is a great dude and he really tries to promote the track in Joliet,After that weekend , I really believe it falls back on us ( the racers ) to help all tracks
    promote our sport.We had several people from the following week-end show-up and where amazed at the action they recieved from a divisional event.It goes to show if we all took alittle more time and effort to help promote our cause maybe we could see bigger purses or at least get a little better treatment from the tracks,Nhra and fellow racers. We'll i'm done now and hope everyone has a great racing season.I know we are planning on it !!!

    Brian Mans sc7662 rapid transit racing
     
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  9. DragRacer

    DragRacer new

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    On the money front, no TAFC team makes money. Even guys like Bucky, Newberry, Gasparrelli, Chesterman, and Payne all spend way more than their sponsorship money pays them. Unless you are Frank Manzo and win 10 races per year you are spending your own money in addition to the sponsorships you may have.

    TAFC is a great class with great people that love to race. None of us have the delusion of even hoping to break even...

    [ February 22, 2005, 04:52 PM: Message edited by: Will Hanna ]
     
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  10. Will Hanna

    Will Hanna We put the 'inside' in Top Alcohol
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    just fyi, i'm keeping a pretty tight grip on this thread. lets keep it objective without getting into finger pointing. lets get some constructive comments on the board rather than negatives.
     
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  11. Doug Watt

    Doug Watt AFD

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    Will,
    I see that You pulled My post. I wasn't trying to be negative, just responding to a post about oil downs. BTW, I think is a very serious problem with the TAD's and TAFC's. If they don't get it under control non of us will be racing at National events or be on TV. Sorry if upset you, I guess it's your ball so you can take it home if you want.
     
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  12. ttutubono

    ttutubono Guest

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    Rate Member posted February 22, 2005 03:57 PM
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------QUOTE.
    On the money front, no TAFC team makes money. Even guys like Bucky, Newberry, Gasparrelli, Chesterman, and Payne all spend way more than their sponsorship money pays them. Unless you are Frank Manzo and win 10 races per year you are spending your own money in addition to the sponsorships you .------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- On top of the$250.000 that Frank gets from sponsors, He told me he spends $50.000 out of pocket. and thats a team that knows what there doing, I say if your just starting out, get some one that knows what there doing, dont shoot all your guns the first year, or you won`t be around for the next one. Gene Terenzio Sr. ;)
     
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  13. Mike Husen

    Mike Husen New Member

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    There is an organization out there that has already started the ball rolling in this direction. It’s called the World Alcohol Racers (WAR) and is based out of Michigan. My name is Mike Husen and I’m the President of WAR. My partner, Jay Prosch-Jensen and I started WAR three years ago and have since made leaps and bounds in this direction. First of all, let me say that launching a business venture of this magnitude takes a tremendous amount on money. We are committed to reaching our goal of being one of the largest sanctioning bodies in the Drag Racing world. Being former racers and now businessmen and promoters, has given us a complete understanding of what the racing world needs. The World Alcohol Racers is run as a business and as businessmen we do not compete against our racers in any way. This allows us to make business decisions that are in best interest to the organization and not any one class. We know what the racers want. They want to be treated like professionals and be paid well. Race teams can compete at WAR events including A-Fuel Dragsters and Alcohol Dragsters running together, Alcohol Funny Cars and Pro Modifieds running in their perspective categories. Two rounds of open qualifying will bring the quickest 8 racecars to the line for the first round with the winners returning for the second round and then the final.

    Promoting the racers as the stars of WAR and giving the fans a show that they won’t soon forget is the theme of the World Alcohol Racers. Classic Drag Racing radio commercials, colorful drivers, racecars with nicknames, staging duels, rivalries, bounties placed on drivers, long smoky burnouts, close side-by-side racing and personal interaction in the pits is the focus of the World Alcohol Racers. Our racers are encouraged to put on a show. On top of our regular purse, we offer a bonus payout of $100 for low ET and top speed with $250 for the best burnout of the first round.

    Racing teams can join WAR for a fee of $100 per year. At all of our events, race teams are allowed entrance with the car, driver and three crew members at no charge. To help launch the racers into stardom, we invite them to participate in on air radio interviews at local radio stations and display their racecars at various locations prior to the event. A media day is also held on the day before the race where local TV, radio and media are brought in to film and interview racers for their broadcasts. During the event, our announcer uses information supplied by the race teams to portray them as Superstars. To excite fan interaction we have an autograph session, prior to the first round, where the racers all gather in a tent to pose for pictures and sign autographs. Between rounds, the WAR announcer circulates the pit area with a remote microphone interviewing racers and fans over the PA system. One lucky fan can win a crew member for a day, one for each class, through a contest sit up at a local radio station. This lucky fan becomes a part of the crew helping in the pits and wearing a team uniform as he or she is out in front of the racecar guiding it back after the burnout.

    A manufacturer’s midway is also part of all WAR events and space is available for sponsors of the teams to display their goods and or services. Race fans circulating the midway will be brought face-to-face with the sponsors of race teams as well as the vendors. All of our race teams are allowed to sell their racing apparel out of their trailer during the entire event.

    Sponsors are beginning to fall into place and every sponsor from last year has re- upped for 2005. Treating our sponsors as true partners has gained us the reputation of being a very valuable marketing tool as they have complete access to all of our fans and racers. We are currently in negotiations with a Nation Television syndication to televise the WAR events in 2005.


    The Future of WAR

    With big plans for the future, including 2-day National Events with open qualifying and large payouts, the World Alcohol Racers has quickly become the fastest growing organization in the Drag Racing world. We have been talking with race tracks in the south and west with plans to expand in this direction in the near future.

    We have been blessed with large car counts, racer participation and the race track have begun to take notice. With enough racer participation, we will split the A-Fuel Dragsters and the Alcohol Dragsters into their perspective classes. The same will apply for the Pro Mods, blown and nitrous. We would also like to move to 16 car fields. This will only happen when the car count remains high and sponsors are secured.

    You can keep abreast on the progress of the World Alcohol Racers by staying tuned to our website at www.worldalcoholracers.com or by contacting me at 616-844-6902.
     
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  14. nitrohawk

    nitrohawk New Member

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    Wow!!!
    All these classes need you to succed Mike.
    Bring us some of these races down to the South Central part of the country as there are quite a few cars in this area who I am sure would support you as I certainly will. Looks like you have covered just about all the concerns that have been outlined by Will and others in this post.
    Winter time is a great time to race down here as there is not much going on and the weather is usually nice.
    Good luck.
     
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  15. Jonathan Johnson

    Jonathan Johnson New Member

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    After reading all these posts I agree something needs to be done. Do I have the answer? Probably not. But, over the past decade I have studied drag racing as a whole the Sport,
    the marketing, etc.

    Will made the comment that we are 'pro-sportsman,' which is 100% truth. You will not find a class that is closer to a pro, or that pulls more pro drivers than the alcohol ranks. So, is there a way to promote the alcohol classes similar to the Busch Series in the Nextel cup? I'm not completely sure, but I bet there could be.

    The class (alcohol) as a whole, has taken many steps over the last few years to help themselves (i.e the TARA), but I think there is definitely more to be done with promotion. I must say the alcohol racers are very good with fans, being friendly, and welcoming when someone stops to watch them work. Unfortunately this is something that is not too prevalent with the Pros anymore. I don't think that the pros are trying to be rude, but the availabilty (with time crunches) is not there, like it is in the alcohol pits, and I think that is a definte plus for the alcohol racers.

    The duscussion mentioned the apparel problem concerning rules mandated by the powers that be. Well I do have an idea for that...Everyone has seen the red trailer that sells Pro Stock shirts, caleed something to the extent of the Pro Stock Depot. Is there a way to do something similar to that with the TARA? Have every member pay a fee (this would buy the trailer and allow product to be sold.) I know that sounds extreme, but let me break it down a bit more. Let's say there are 60 members of the TARA and everyone (driver or owner or both) has an additional fee of $350 to have access to this. That would cover the trailer and setting it up. Have a Temp come in at the national events and run the trailer at $6 bucks an hour. Yea, I know ppl are grumbling at my numbers here, but keep reading. Houston has roughly 130,000 ppl over the three days...now if you sold 2500 shirts, at $20, there's $50,000. Now, if teams (those that choose to particiapte) have enough shirts done you can have about 8 bucks in ahirt and there's $12 profit per shirt. More details would have to be worked out if only 4 of your shirts were sold, and 3 of mine, and twenty of so and so's. Bottom line, there's an outlet to get exposure and it ( I think) falls in line with NHRA's policies. Becuase in order to have a merchandise trailer the company has to have a car entered at every event, and I think there would be at least one member of the TARA at every national right? Now I know these are jsut figures and a lot of other details would need to be worked out, but here is a chance for promotion and individual team profits, but even more, the teams working together to both promote, unify, and sell the class(es) as a whole.

    Obviously this would only be for national events, because you can sell from your tailer and divisional events.

    Will, guuys, and comments, cares, or concerns here? Maybe anyone have any ideas of how we could "work" with NHRA and make this more of a Busch series type class, because, that is essentially what it is, without the credibility.

    JJ
     
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  16. Darren Smith

    Darren Smith New Member

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    The first Natl. event I ever went to at Firebird in '94. The Fuel cars were done so I go down to Grab a brew and something to eat. After like 30-45 min. of other sportsman cars all of a sudden the cars Got LOUD again! The people with me were like "What are those"! Turns out it was Alky First round, we were like Hurry we may miss it! I think If NHRA ran alcohol before the Pro's every time it would help the class IMO!
     
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  17. bruce mullins

    bruce mullins Top Dragster

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    most of the ideas i have read are good except nobody has talked on how to bring the cost down. the problem with t-shirt sales is this, most people that spectate don't have big pockets full of money after entries. if you have $25 bucks in your pocket to buy a shirt would you buy a john force shirt or frank manzo (no disrespect). now at a divisional we should all be allowed to sell items. nhra let bunny burkett sell stuff at the cecil county divisional. she brings a second trailer to the races full of shirts and goodies to sell and they let her park it right next to her pit. second thing that needs to be done to help us is rules like the pro teams have gotten lately. i would love to see this new rev limiter rule put on us. we all know the rpms is what has put the parts attrition through the roof. if rev limiters were put on at 9400 ,breakage would come down. i went a 5.71 and shifted my car at 9200 . i am sure cars could still run 60's. fans have labled us as leakers and as long as the big teams turn them 10,000 and higher everyone has to to run fast. some of the big teams run over parts and don't care. all that does is make all alcohol racers look bad. some tracks hate divisionals because of the leakers.i hate that lable but until something is done to calm parts breakage i think we are stuck with a lable.
     
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  18. ttutubono

    ttutubono Guest

    Bruce, I agree with you, you should be alowed to sell your wares, only thimg is that every one can`t bring an extra trailer, ( there is no room for that) but sell stuff out of your trailer, about the rev limiter, that would be fine too, only let you run 125 % over, and limit the reves to 8,500 rpm or 9,000 why dont you get every one together, and pitition NHRA.you can do it right on this site.( may be i just did?) Gene Terenzio Sr.

    [ February 24, 2005, 11:44 AM: Message edited by: ttutubono ]
     
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  19. bruce mullins

    bruce mullins Top Dragster

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    only problem is every one would have to agree on the rev limiter. i read somewhere it only cost $150. sure we could put the overdrive at 125 percent and put the limiter at 9000. low rpms and haul ass. anyone else interested?
     
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  20. ttutubono

    ttutubono Guest

    Att. Will Hanna,is there a way that you can write a tread that would serve as a petition for the TA/FC owners for there support of the thing bruce mullins and my self brought up on your,observations on improvment thread for alky cars? Gene Terenzio Sr.

    [ February 24, 2005, 06:28 PM: Message edited by: ttutubono ]
     
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