Jet area chart

Discussion in 'Manton Push Rods Top Alcohol Tech Questions' started by promodracer, Aug 5, 2014.

  1. promodracer

    promodracer Member

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    Where can I get quick jet area chart to figure my jet areas quicker.
     
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  2. rickey

    rickey Member

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  3. promodracer

    promodracer Member

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    #3
  4. rickey

    rickey Member

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    What range jets you want chart for? Ii can make you one
     
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  5. kosky racing

    kosky racing Comp Eliminator

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    jet chart

    Go to Gorrs web site Area chart and gallons for jet size .----lots of good info
     
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  6. WIZBANG

    WIZBANG Member

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    How do you know what size the hole is ?
     
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  7. Mike Canter

    Mike Canter Top Dragster

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    Be very careful of the Ralph Gorr website Jet Flow Charts. According to Ralph his GPM Flows at 150 psi are with water and not methanol. There is a big difference in GPM. The charts are OK for the jet area.
     
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  8. Dave Koehler

    Dave Koehler Member

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    #8
  9. kosky racing

    kosky racing Comp Eliminator

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    area

    The question was about AREA not water or menthanol--
     
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  10. promodracer

    promodracer Member

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    Ralph and spike flowed my rage pump and i am using his gucci (as he calls it ) bv with idle and stage circuit.
    Some where a mistake was made and i was told to increase one jet by .010 Now my pump pressure is only 114 at 8000 rpm. So i have dropped all manifold jets by .002 as i have heat on straps only down to base only. So i want to now calculate total jet area to get a starting point.
    So are you thinking my 244 lb pump pressures at.8000 rpm were with water. Or am i confusing things
    One more thing i have a 65 lb idle check which seems foreign to k style bv guys.
     
    #10
  11. promodracer

    promodracer Member

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    #11
  12. promodracer

    promodracer Member

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    40 through 70s up to 80.
    Mine are all flowed but i suppose thats not relevant.
     
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  13. promodracer

    promodracer Member

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    Ok so whats the best way for me to calculate my gorr flowed jet area. Forgive me im learning.
     
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  14. rickey

    rickey Member

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    I would reccomend a flow meter

    Jetsize sqin of area
    40 0.00126
    41 0.00132
    42 0.00139
    43 0.00145
    44 0.00152
    45 0.00159
    46 0.00166
    47 0.00173
    48 0.00181
    49 0.00189
    50 0.00196
    51 0.00204
    52 0.00212
    53 0.00221
    54 0.00229
    55 0.00238
    56 0.00246
    57 0.00255
    58 0.00264
    59 0.00273
    60 0.00283
    61 0.00292
    62 0.00302
    63 0.00312
    64 0.00322
    65 0.00332
    66 0.00342
    67 0.00353
    68 0.00363
    69 0.00374
    70 0.00385
    71 0.00396
    72 0.00407
    73 0.00419
    74 0.00430
    75 0.00442
    76 0.00454
    77 0.00466
    78 0.00478
    79 0.00490
    80 0.00503
    81 0.00515
    82 0.00528
    83 0.00541
    84 0.00554
    85 0.00567
     
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  15. Dave Koehler

    Dave Koehler Member

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    Third one on the list. Hit your "refresh" button a couple of times in case you have been to that page before.
    Air Bleeds are on the FI Tools page

    Dave Koehler
    http://www.koehlerinjection.com
     
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    Last edited: Aug 7, 2014
  16. superpro453

    superpro453 Member

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    Idle check

    The idle check pressure is right according to the info on Gorr's web site (http://gorrfuelsystems.com/uploads/online_manual.pdf). Do not so what we did and drop it to 'normal' bv values or you'll burn something up (we did a piston, which blew out the rocker cover gaskets and pushed oil under the tyres and it went very pear shaped from there...).

    Martyn
     
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    Last edited: Aug 7, 2014
  17. Blownalky

    Blownalky Top Sportsman

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    Dave gave a link to a great chart but if you ever get stuck without the chart, you can use a little math to figure it out. Pen and paper works but a calculator is quicker whether in hand or on a computer. It's the old πr² or pi x radius squared formula.


    So for example, if you have a .100 jet or nozzle, the diameter of the hole is .100. You divide the number (diameter) in half and that would give you the radius which in this case would be .050.

    Take that .050 and multiply it by itself. So it would be .050 times .050 which equals .0025. This is the r² or radius squared part.

    Now take that .0025 and multiply that by pi which is 3.1415926. How far you stretch out the pi number after the decimal place will slightly affect your final number. Not a big deal, just something to be aware of when comparing.

    This would be .0025 times 3.1415926 which equals .0078539815.

    Expressed in math it would be: πr² = 3.1415926 x .0025 = .0078539815. You could round this off to .007854 if you like to make it more manageable.

    You need memorize pi for this to work easily so that is a drawback to this method.



    Alternately, you can use another shortcut way to find what the area is. Multiply .7854 x d² where d is the diameter. So using the above sized nozzle, you would have .100 x .100 = .01. Then .01 x .7854 which equals .00785400. Using .7854 is familiar with most folks as it is used in figuring cubic inches and also for figuring out the volume of the cylinders when cc’ing an engine.

    Figuring this out only accounts for the area of the nozzle or jet. The actual hole size may not be the same as what is stamped on the piece or the entrance to the hole may have irregularities that will affect flow. Pressure affects flow too.

    Tom
     
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  18. Larry Reep

    Larry Reep New Member

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    If you take water flowed at 100psi x .9868 you get accurate measure of methanol Don't know about 150psi
    Reeper
     
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  19. Mike Canter

    Mike Canter Top Dragster

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    Yes, that is correct. I have jet area and GPM charts I have corrected to methanol.
     
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  20. rpt

    rpt New Member

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    Hi everyone,

    Mike, can you please send me a copy of your GPM charts corrected to methanol to piottolorenzo@gmail.com? (both nozzle and main jets)
    I'm getting crazy because I find different methods for the conversion. In my opinion the right formula should be
    FlowAlky = FlowWater / sqrt(specific gravity).

    Lets say specific gravity is 0.8 so it turns out that

    FlowAlky = FlowWater* 1.118

    Is it wrong?

    EDIT: I'm referring to 150PSI but the conversion should not be affected by the testing pressure
     
    #20
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2017

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